Discuss Your Feels for Amy Schumer, Comedy Powerhouse

When Women Who Kill premiered on Showtime in 2013, Amy Schumer was not the massive comedic presence she is today. It was just weeks before Comedy Central premiered the first season of Inside Amy Schumer, but already the buzz surrounding the sketch series was absurd. Two seasons, 20 episodes and dozens of profoundly funny sketches later, it seems the buzz wasn't enough.

Now everyone wants a piece of the the 33-year-old New Yorker. She sells out theaters, inspires young women and is currently shooting her own film, Trainwreck with Judd Apatow. Oh, and she was just nominated for a Critics' Choice Award in the Best Actress in a Comedy Series category alongside modern-day comedic icons Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Veep) — who took home the award — and Amy Poehler (Parks and Recreation).

Needless to say, Schumer's accomplished a lot in a year. Though, really, comedy nerds and those dedicated to covering the world of funny — that's me! — had known well before Inside Amy Schumer that she had the talent and the balls to break out. Women Who Kill is the perfect snapshot of a respected, working comic and on the verge of becoming a total superstar.

Schumer served as executive producer on Women Who Kill, which made her a leader and tastemaker of sorts. This is not just an Amy Schumer special; it's a fast-paced comedy event featuring three more excellent comics: Rachel Feinstein, Nikki Glaser and Marina Franklin, all of whom have been killing it for years, headlining on the road and constantly working out new material in New York City clubs. Watching these four comics perform their best 15 minutes in a packed theater is an absolute delight. Tell us what you think about all things Amy Schumer and Women Who Kill in the comments below.

Documentary Club is a recurring feature in which we watch and discuss the finest documentaries and comedy specials available to stream on Netflix — together, as a family. Join us, won't you? For more, head to netflix.kinja.com.

Dylan Gadino is the founder and editor of Laughspin.com, which covers all things comedy. He hopes the Shire is real.

This post is a sponsored collaboration between Netflix and Studio@Gawker.