Now That Louie Is Over, Discuss Louis C.K.'s Comedic Evolution

So you probably want to talk about Louie. To process, as it were. We'll get to that, but in the meantime a prescription for dealing with your loss of the show: Live at the Beacon Theater. Louis C.K. has been a comedy game-changer this season, but sometimes it's important to look back as we look forward.

When C.K. released his Emmy-winning comedy special independently in 2011, he solidified his position as a revolutionary for comedy fans, and for the entertainment industry as a whole. At the same time, he was preparing the second season of his low-budget, critically acclaimed FX series, which had its season finale on June 16, and needless to say broke new ground in comedy on many levels. There's a lot to unpack within the show alone, but to understand where he's gone, it's important to understand where he's been, and Live at the Beacon is the comedian at his best.

The hype surrounding C.K. for the last five years is well-deserved. On Live at the Beacon, he's effortlessly funny and excruciatingly honest about the way he sees the world and, to a much larger extent, himself. The special brought his signature intellect to the forefront, giving his die-hard fans exactly what they've come to expect and pulling in hoards of new fans as well. He hasn't slowed down, either. C.K. continues to change the game with Louie, and the TV format allows him more outlets — through both expert filmmaking and writing.

Tell us what you thought of Live at the Beacon Theater, and how you think C.K. has evolved — both in his stand-up and with Louie — in the comments below. Yes, you can also take this opportunity to celebrate, air grievances about, and otherwise discuss Louie.

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Dylan Gadino is the founder and editor of Laughspin.com, which covers all things comedy. He hopes the Shire is real.

This post is a sponsored collaboration between Netflix and Studio@Gawker.